Monday, 13 January 2014

A Place of One's Own (1945)

A Place of One's Own (1945) is a British film directed by Bernard Knowles. An impressive ghost story based on the novel by Osbert Sitwell, it stars James Mason, Barbara Mullen, Margaret Lockwood, Dennis Price and Dulcie Gray. Mason and Mullen are unnaturally aged to play the old couple. It was one of the cycles of Gainsborough Melodramas.

Mr and Mrs Smedhurst (James Mason and Barbara Mullen) is a business couple wanting to give up work. They find a mansion in the country, Bellingham House, at a bargain price. They move in along with their servants and soon learn the house is apparently ghostly – but Mr Smedhurst especially is skeptical of the paranormal myth. 

They invite a young companion, Annette (Margaret Lockwood), to join them but within days of arriving she gradually begins hearing strange voices. The new owners learn that a young invalid girl was deemed to have been murdered 40 years before in the house – and their presumptions of the supernatural are challenged.

When the spirit of the murdered girl acquires Annette, her health declines considerably and soon she’s at death's door. A young doctor, Dr Selbie (Dennis Price), has fallen deeply in love with Annette and tries to heal her but to no avail. In a state of delirium, Annette calls for old Dr Marsham (Ernest Thesiger), the GP who had attended to the dead girl 40 years before.

Tuesday, 26 February 2013

A Place of One's Own

A Place of One's Own (1945) is a British film directed by Bernard Knowles. An atmospheric ghost story based on the novel by Osbert Sitwell, it stars James Mason, Barbara Mullen, Margaret Lockwood, Dennis Price and Dulcie Gray. Mason and Mullen are artificially aged to play the old couple. It was one of the cycle of Gainsborough Melodramas. 

Mr and Mrs Smedhurst (James Mason and Barbara Mullen) are a business couple wanting to retire. They find a mansion in the country, Bellingham House, at a bargain price. They move in along with their servants and soon learn the house is supposedly haunted – but Mr Smedhurst in particular is sceptical of the paranormal myth. They invite a young companion, Annette (Margaret Lockwood), to join them but within days of arriving she steadily begins hearing strange voices. The new owners learn that a young invalid girl was believed to have been murdered 40 years previously in the house – and their preconceptions of the supernatural are challenged.

When the spirit of the murdered girl possesses Annette, her health declines drastically and soon she’s at death's door. A young doctor, Dr Selbie (Dennis Price), has fallen deeply in love with Annette and attempts to cure her but to no avail. In a state of delirium, Annette calls for old Dr Marsham (Ernest Thesiger), the GP who had attended to the dead girl 40 years earlier.

Thursday, 26 July 2012

A Room of One's Own

A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women's colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. While this extended essay in fact employs a fictional narrator and narrative to explore women both as writers of and characters in fiction, the manuscript for the delivery of the series of lectures, titled "Women and Fiction", and hence the essay, are considered non-fiction. The essay is generally seen as a feminist text, and is noted in its argument for both a literal and figural space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by patriarchy.

Friday, 26 August 2011

The Book of Love (song)

"The Book of Love" (also titled "(Who Wrote) The Book of Love") is a rock and roll song, originally by The Monotones. It was written by three members of the group, Warren Davis, George Malone and Charles Patrick, and it peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Lead singer Charles Patrick heard a Pepsodent toothpaste commercial with the line "wonder where the yellow went". From there he got the idea for the line, "I wonder, wonder, wonder who, who wrote the book of love", working it up into a song with Davis and Malone. The "boom" part of the song was a result of a kid kicking a ball against the garage while they were rehearsing, it sounded good, so they added it to the song.
In September 1957, the Monotones recorded "The Book Of Love", which was released on the Mascot label in December that year. The small record company could not cope with its popularity, and it was reissued on Chess Records' subsidiary Argo label in February 1958. It attained a Billboard ranking of #5 for pop songs and #3 for R&B in 1958. It also reached #5 in Australia. In the UK, the hit version was a cover by The Mudlarks.

In 1985, the song was covered on The Four Seasons (band) album Streetfighter.
In 1988, the song became the new theme song for The Newlywed Game, when Paul Rodriguez replaced Bob Eubanks as host for one year.
In 1990, Ben E. King and Bo Diddley featuring Doug Lazy recorded a revamped rap version of "Book of Love" for the soundtrack of the film, Book of Love